Publication type: Article in scientific journal
Type of review: Peer review (publication)
Title: A determinant in the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor prevents trafficking to lysosomes
Authors: Rohrer, Jack
Schweizer, Anja
Johnson, Karl F.
Kornfeld, Stuart
DOI: 10.1083/jcb.130.6.1297
Published in: Journal of Cell Biology
Volume(Issue): 130
Issue: 6
Pages: 1297
Pages to: 1306
Issue Date: 15-Sep-1995
Publisher / Ed. Institution: Rockefeller University Press
ISSN: 0021-9525
Language: English
Subject (DDC): 572: Biochemistry
Abstract: The bovine cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that cycles between the trans-Golgi network, endosomes, and the plasma membrane. When the terminal 40 residues were deleted from the 67-amino acid cytoplasmic tail of the CD-MPR, the half-life of the receptor was drastically decreased and the mutant receptor was recovered in lysosomes. Analysis of additional cytoplasmic tail truncation mutants and alanine-scanning mutants implicated amino acids 34-39 as being critical for avoidance of lysosomal degradation. The cytoplasmic tail of the CD-MPR was partially effective in preventing the lysosomal membrane protein Lamp1 from entering lysosomes. Complete exclusion required both the CD-MPR cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domain. The transmembrane domain alone had just a minor effect on the distribution of Lamp1. These findings indicate that the cytoplasmic tail of the CD-MPR contains a signal that prevents the receptor from trafficking to lysosomes. The transmembrane domain of the CD-MPR also contributes to this function.
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/6831
Fulltext version: Published version
License (according to publishing contract): Licence according to publishing contract
Departement: Life Sciences and Facility Management
Appears in Collections:Publikationen Life Sciences und Facility Management

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