Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-3506
Title: Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking : origin of the Raman modes in superconducting cuprates
Authors : Munnikes, N.
Muschler, B.
Venturini, Francesca
Tassini, L.
Prestel, W.
Ono, Shimpei
Ando, Yoichi
Peets, D. C.
Hardy, W. N.
Liang, Ruixing
Bonn, D. A.
Damascelli, A.
Eisaki, H.
Greven, M.
Erb, A.
Hackl, R.
Published in : Physical Review B
Volume(Issue) : 84
Issue : 144523
Publisher / Ed. Institution : American Physical Society
Issue Date: 2011
License (according to publishing contract) : Licence according to publishing contract
Type of review: Peer review (Publication)
Language : English
Subjects : Infrared spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; Superconductor; Cuprate
Subject (DDC) : 530: Physics
Abstract: We performed Raman scattering experiments on superconductivity-induced features in Bi2Sr2(Ca1−xYx)Cu2O8+δ (Bi-2212), YBa2Cu3O6+x (Y-123), and Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl-2201) single crystals. The results in combination with earlier ones enable us to systematically analyze the spectral features in the doping range 0.07⩽p⩽0.24. In B2g (xy) symmetry, we find universal spectra and the maximal gap energy Δ0 to scale with the superconducting transition temperature Tc. The B1g (x2−y2) spectra in all three compounds show an anomalous increase of the intensity toward overdoping. The energy scale of the corresponding peak is neither related to the pairing energy nor to the pseudogap, but possibly stems from a symmetry breaking transition at the onset point of superconductivity at psc2≃0.27.
Departement: School of Engineering
Organisational Unit: Institute of Applied Mathematics and Physics (IAMP)
Publication type: Article in scientific Journal
DOI : 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.144523
10.21256/zhaw-3506
ISSN: 1098-0121
1550-235X
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/2639
Appears in Collections:Publikationen School of Engineering

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Munnikes_Raman_PRB.PDF1.31 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.