Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-25302
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dc.contributor.authorFriedel, Marina-
dc.contributor.authorChiodo, Gabriel-
dc.contributor.authorStenke, Andrea-
dc.contributor.authorDomeisen, Daniela I. V.-
dc.contributor.authorFueglistaler, Stephan-
dc.contributor.authorAnet, Julien G.-
dc.contributor.authorPeter, Thomas-
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-15T14:26:32Z-
dc.date.available2022-07-15T14:26:32Z-
dc.date.issued2022-07-07-
dc.identifier.issn1752-0894de_CH
dc.identifier.issn1752-0908de_CH
dc.identifier.urihttps://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/25302-
dc.description.abstractLarge-scale chemical depletion of ozone due to anthropogenic emissions occurs over Antarctica as well as, to a lesser degree, the Arctic. Surface climate predictability in the Northern Hemisphere might be improved due to a previously proposed, albeit uncertain, link to springtime ozone depletion in the Arctic. Here we use observations and targeted chemistry–climate experiments from two models to isolate the surface impacts of ozone depletion from complex downward dynamical influences. We find that springtime stratospheric ozone depletion is consistently followed by surface temperature and precipitation anomalies with signs consistent with a positive Arctic Oscillation, namely, warm and dry conditions over southern Europe and Eurasia and moistening over northern Europe. Notably, we show that these anomalies, affecting large portions of the Northern Hemisphere, are driven substantially by the loss of stratospheric ozone. This is due to ozone depletion leading to a reduction in short-wave radiation absorption, when in turn causing persistent negative temperature anomalies in the lower stratosphere and a delayed break-up of the polar vortex. These results indicate that the inclusion of interactive ozone chemistry in atmospheric models can considerably improve the predictability of Northern Hemisphere surface climate on seasonal timescales.de_CH
dc.language.isoende_CH
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupde_CH
dc.relation.ispartofNature Geosciencede_CH
dc.rightsLicence according to publishing contractde_CH
dc.subjectAtmospheric chemistryde_CH
dc.subjectAtmospheric dynamicsde_CH
dc.subject.ddc551: Geologie und Hydrologiede_CH
dc.titleSpringtime arctic ozone depletion forces northern hemisphere climate anomaliesde_CH
dc.typeBeitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschriftde_CH
dcterms.typeTextde_CH
zhaw.departementSchool of Engineeringde_CH
zhaw.organisationalunitZentrum für Aviatik (ZAV)de_CH
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41561-022-00974-7de_CH
dc.identifier.doi10.21256/zhaw-25302-
zhaw.funding.euNode_CH
zhaw.issue7de_CH
zhaw.originated.zhawYesde_CH
zhaw.pages.end547de_CH
zhaw.pages.start541de_CH
zhaw.publication.statusacceptedVersionde_CH
zhaw.volume15de_CH
zhaw.embargo.end2023-01-07de_CH
zhaw.publication.reviewPeer review (Publikation)de_CH
zhaw.webfeedMeteorology, Environment and Air Traffic (ZAV)de_CH
zhaw.author.additionalNode_CH
zhaw.display.portraitYesde_CH
Appears in collections:Publikationen School of Engineering

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