Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-3959
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Geoff-
dc.contributor.authorMinonne, Clemente-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-29T14:06:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-29T14:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.issn1479-4411de_CH
dc.identifier.urihttps://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/9922-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful managers focus their attention on factors that are critical in establishing and maintaining an organisation’s competitive edge. The knowledge and skill of employees is one of those factors and it requires proactive management attention. Conceptually, this is achieved through Knowledge Management, a term that has existed in the mainstream of business lexicon for quite some time. Despite this, there is the conspicuous Absence of a common understanding of the term that frustrates many managers. Studies have clearly established that there are three interdependent and complementary pillars that support the concept of Knowledge Management. These are Organisational Learning Management (OLM), Organisational Knowledge Management (OKM) and Intellectual Capital Management (ICM). OLM, which has so far dominated both academic and practitioner debate, concerns itself with the problem of capturing, organising and retrieving explicit knowledge, or information, and has led to the simplistic misconception that Knowledge Management only involves the capture, or downloading, of the content of employees’ minds. ICM is dominated by those particularly interested in defining key Performance indicators that will measure the impact and the benefits of applying knowledge management practices. If management requires measurement this is an essential task but it can only be undertaken once an organisation has clearly established the strategy-structure-process parameters to ensure it accesses, creates and embeds the knowledge that it needs...the OKM pillar of knowledge management. This paper looks more deeply at this pillar and in particular the lack of a general integrative approach to enhancing organisational performance in this key strategic area. It considers to what extent such an approach may help an organisation more effectively manage its most relevant source of competitive advantage. With a greater awareness of the various factors allied to the managing and leveraging of human oriented and system oriented knowledge assets, some proposals are put forward to assist in developing or redefining an organisation’s intellectual capital reporting models in search of a planning, control and performance measurement system that accounts for the management of an organisation's intellectual assets.de_CH
dc.language.isoende_CH
dc.publisherAcademic Conferences and Publishing International Limitedde_CH
dc.relation.ispartofElectronic journal of knowledge managementde_CH
dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/de_CH
dc.subjectOrganisational knowledge managementde_CH
dc.subjectPerformance managementde_CH
dc.subject.ddc658.4: Leitendes Managementde_CH
dc.titleMeasuring the effects of knowledge management practicesde_CH
dc.typeBeitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschriftde_CH
dcterms.typeTextde_CH
zhaw.departementSchool of Management and Lawde_CH
zhaw.organisationalunitInstitut für Wirtschaftsinformatik (IWI)de_CH
dc.identifier.doi10.21256/zhaw-3959-
zhaw.funding.euNode_CH
zhaw.issue1de_CH
zhaw.originated.zhawYesde_CH
zhaw.pages.end170de_CH
zhaw.pages.start161de_CH
zhaw.publication.statuspublishedVersionde_CH
zhaw.volume8de_CH
zhaw.publication.reviewPeer review (Publikation)de_CH
Appears in Collections:Publikationen School of Management and Law

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Measuring the Effects of Knowledge Management_minonne-1.pdf109.68 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.