Publication type: Article in scientific journal
Type of review: Peer review (publication)
Title: Suppressing the morning rise in cortisol impairs free recall
Authors: Rimmele, Ulrike
Meier, Flurina
Lange, Tanja
Born, Jan
DOI: 10.1101/lm.1728510
Published in: Learning & Memory
Volume(Issue): 2010
Issue: 17
Pages: 186
Pages to: 190
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher / Ed. Institution: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
ISSN: 1549-5485
1072-0502
Language: English
Subjects: Adolescent; Circadian rhythm; Cross-over study; Double-blind method; Emotion; Enzyme inhibitor; Human; Hydrocortisone; Male; Memory disorder; Mental recall; Metyrapone; Neuropsychological test; Photic stimulation; Young adult
Subject (DDC): 610: Medicine and health
Abstract: Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning awakening, following administration of the cortisol synthesis inhibitor metyrapone or placebo. Unexpectedly, the metyrapone-induced cortisol suppression significantly impaired free recall of both materials. Recognition remained unaffected. Thus, not only high, but also very low glucocorticoid levels impair retrieval, with the latter effect possibly reflecting insufficient occupation of hippocampal/amygdalar mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs).
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/9925
Fulltext version: Published version
License (according to publishing contract): Licence according to publishing contract
Departement: School of Management and Law
Organisational Unit: Winterthur Institute of Health Economics (WIG)
Appears in collections:Publikationen School of Management and Law

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