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Title: Computational methods for exploring the dynamics of cancer : the potential of state variables for description of complex biological systems
Authors : Scheidegger, Stephan
Fuchs, Hans Ulrich
Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel
Proceedings: Proceedings of the international symposium on nonlinear theory and its applications : NOLTA2014, Luzern, Switzerland, september 14-18, 2014
Pages : 168
Pages to: 171
Conference details: NOLTA2014: International Symposium on Nonlinear Theory and its Applications, Stoop Group, NOLTA Society, Luzern, 14–18 September 2014
Issue Date: 2014
Language : Englisch / English
Subject (DDC) : 570: Biologie
610: Medizin, Gesundheit
Abstract: Observing dynamic patterns in silico and comparing them to experimental data in vitro or in vivo could help us identify and quantify dynamic processes. Since modellers are faced with a high degree of complexity of biological systems, appropriate concepts of system descriptions are needed. The use of state variables is expected to make models applicable to a wider range of the dynamics of biological systems. This is demonstrated by the Multi-Hit-Repair (MHR-)model which is based on a transient dose equivalent. The model calculates the survival of cells irradiated by ionizing radiation and it describes correctly a large variety of radio-biological observations. In addition, the MHR-model is bridging the gap between processes at the molecular or cellular level and tissue dynamics.
Departement: School of Engineering
Organisational Unit: Institut für Angewandte Mathematik und Physik (IAMP)
Publication type: Konferenz: Paper / Conference Paper
Type of review: Keine Angabe / Not specified
DOI : 10.21256/zhaw-1764
License (according to publishing contract) : Lizenz gemäss Verlagsvertrag / Licence according to publishing contract
Appears in Collections:Publikationen School of Engineering

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