Publication type: Article in scientific journal
Type of review: Peer review (publication)
Title: Federalism and the management of the COVID-19 crisis : centralisation, decentralisation and (non-)coordination
Authors: Hegele, Yvonne
Schnabel, Johanna
et. al: No
DOI: 10.1080/01402382.2021.1873529
Published in: West European Politics
Volume(Issue): 44
Issue: 5-6
Pages: 1052
Pages to: 1076
Issue Date: 2-Feb-2021
Publisher / Ed. Institution: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 0140-2382
1743-9655
Language: English
Subjects: COVID-19; Coordination; Federalism; Intergovernmental relation
Subject (DDC): 320: Politics
Abstract: The ability of federal states to manage the COVID-19 pandemic has created much debate. Federations differ considerably in the way they have been tackling the crisis, however. To shed light on how European federations (Austria, Germany, Switzerland) managed COVID-19, this paper distinguishes two dimensions of federal decision making: centralised/decentralised and unilateral/coordinated decision making. Drawing on official government documents and press reports, it examines decisions on the introduction of containment measures and their subsequent easing during the first wave. While Austria and Switzerland adopted a centralised approach, decentralised decision making prevailed in Germany. However, most decisions were coordinated between the governments at the federal and constituent unit level in Austria and Germany, in contrast to Switzerland where unilateralism prevailed. This difference in approaches can partly be explained by the distribution of powers. Political and economic factors also influenced the choice of crisis management strategies.
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/22619
Fulltext version: Published version
License (according to publishing contract): Licence according to publishing contract
Departement: School of Management and Law
Organisational Unit: Institute of Public Management (IVM)
Appears in collections:Publikationen School of Management and Law

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