Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-21837
Publication type: Article in scientific journal
Type of review: Peer review (publication)
Title: Food and health : individual, cultural, or intellectual matters?
Authors: Nordström, Karin
Coff, Christian
Jönsson, Håkan
Nordenfeldt, Lennart
Görman, Ulf
et. al: No
DOI: 10.1007/s12263-013-0336-8
10.21256/zhaw-21837
Published in: Genes & Nutrition
Volume(Issue): 8
Issue: 4
Pages: 357
Pages to: 363
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher / Ed. Institution: BioMed Central
ISSN: 1865-3499
1555-8932
Language: English
Subjects: Personalised nutrition; Ethics; Social justice
Subject (DDC): 613.2: Dietetics
Abstract: In personalized nutrition, food is a tool for good health, implying an instrumental relationship between food and health. Food receives a secondary value, while health would appear to be a descriptive biological concept. This article gives an introduction to cultural understandings of food and health. The wider definition of food and health is explored in relation to the commonly used scientific approach that tends to take a more reductionist approach to food and health. The different discourses on food and health are being discussed in relation to ethical aspects of personalized nutrition. The success of personalized nutrition is likely dependent upon the ability to integrate the scientific approach with everyday cultural, emotional, ethical, and sensual understandings of food. Health theories can be divided into two principal rival types—biostatistical and holistic. Biostatistical focuses on survival, while holistic focuses on ability as a precondition for health. Arguments in favor of a holistic and individualistic theory of health and illness are presented. This implies a focus on the ability of the individual to realize his or her “vital goals.” A holistic and individualistic health concept may have a reinforcing effect on the individualized approach in personalized nutrition. It allows focus on individual health premises and related dietary means of health promotion, as well as an individualized perspective on the objectives of health promotion. An individualistic notion of health also indicates that people with high levels of vital goals benefit more easily. To reach beyond these groups is likely difficult. This potential injustice should be balanced with global preventive medical programs.
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/21837
Fulltext version: Published version
License (according to publishing contract): Licence according to publishing contract
Departement: Health Professions
Organisational Unit: Institute of Health Sciences (IGW)
Appears in collections:Publikationen Gesundheit

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