Title: Violent video games and cyberbullying : why education is better than regulation
Authors : Genner, Sarah
Published in : Minding minors wandering the web : regulating online child safety
Pages : 229
Pages to: 243
Editors of the parent work: van der Hof, Simone
van den Berg, Bibi
Schermer, Bart
Publisher / Ed. Institution : T.M.C. Asser Press, The Hague
Publisher / Ed. Institution: Den Haag
Issue Date: 2014
Series : Information Technology and Law Series
Series volume: 24
Language : Englisch / English
Subject (DDC) : 302: Soziale Interaktion
370: Bildung und Erziehung
Abstract: Online safety for youth is a growing concern for parents, educators, and policymakers. Legal regulation of online risks and youth protection are often well intentioned, but not effective as this chapter shows using the example of violent shooter games and cyberbullying in Switzerland. Politicians demand bans and regulations in spite of the limited success of previous youth protection laws. A closer look at Swiss public debates on the ban on “killer games” unveils that regulation concerning youth and media is very complex and influenced by political interests of certain policymakers. Research on media effects shows that risks are highly interconnected with psychological resilience. Resilient youth are less susceptible to negative effects of media violence and cyberbullying. The chapter summarizes research to date on violent games (which are increasingly played online) and cyberbullying, analyses the political public debate and, finally, emphasizes why educational measures and focusing on fostering psychological resilience are more effective than legal regulation in the long run to reduce online risks.
Departement: Angewandte Psychologie
Organisational Unit: Psychologisches Institut (PI)
Publication type: Buchbeitrag / Book Part
DOI : 10.1007/978-94-6265-005-3_13
ISBN: 978-94-6265-004-6
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/1883
Appears in Collections:Publikationen Angewandte Psychologie

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