Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-5036
Title: Breaking : password entry is fine
Authors : Pidel, Catie Jo
Neuhaus, Stephan
Proceedings: Proceedings of the 2019 Human-Computer Interaction International Conference
Conference details: 21st International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Orlando, USA, 26-31 July 2019
Publisher / Ed. Institution : Hochschule Düsseldorf
Issue Date: 2019
License (according to publishing contract) : Licence according to publishing contract
Type of review: Not specified
Language : English
Subjects : Security; Passwords; Usability
Subject (DDC) : 005: Computer programming, programs and data
Abstract: In our digital world, we have become well acquainted with the login form---username shown as plaintext, password shown as asterisks or dots. This design dates back to the early days of terminal computing, and despite huge changes in nearly every other area, the humble login form remains largely untouched. When coupled with the ubiquity of smartphones, this means we often find ourselves entering complex passwords on a tiny touchscreen keyboard with little or no visual feedback on what has been typed. This paper explores how password masking on mobile devices affects the error rate for password entry. We created an app where users entered selected passwords into masked and unmasked password fields, measuring things like typing speed, error rate, and number of backspaces. We then did an exploratory data analysis fo the data, and our findings show that, perhaps unexpectedly, there is no significant difference between masked and unmasked passwords for any of these metrics.
Departement: School of Engineering
Organisational Unit: Institute of Applied Information Technology (InIT)
Publication type: Conference Paper
DOI : 10.21256/zhaw-5036
URI: https://digitalcollection.zhaw.ch/handle/11475/15598
Appears in Collections:Publikationen School of Engineering

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